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OVERVIEW of the Proven Enterprise Sales Process, Steps 1 to 10
By Peter Meyer

If you are interested in improving your enterprise sales and you have some 5 minute time slots, this can be a great read for you. You'll find a series on a proven and pretty unique sales process that works a charm for enterprise sales.
The process has 7 steps. Over the years we've found that if you get through step 4 you'll have a 95% chance of getting a fairly large enterprise deal at full margin. And these deals usually close sooner than you would have expected.
In other words, this is a great series of articles to share with sales teams and channels. Which I think is why Excellence Essentials commissioned it for their journal.
The series of articles was an experiment for both the journal and for me, and it seems to have worked pretty well. The articles are being published once a month. As they do, you will find the article published here as well. Right now, we are half way through. Articles 1 to 5 (of 10) are now in this blog.
Of course you should read them on the journal if you can. Take a look at: Excellence Essentionals
However, if you want to see them all in one place, right here in the Meyer Group site is where that will happen.
Since this is all public domain now, I'd like to encourage you to share the articles. Please give them attribution to Excellence Essentials and to the Meyer Group.
If you have a channel operation or direct sales team that would benefit from some attention, drop me a line and lets talk about tailoring the content for your company. It can be easy, and if your channels or sales teams use it, you can grow your revenue substantially. That is what I have in mind.
The first article is right here, and the rest follow it on the same page.
With thanks!



Step 1 - Start Before Your First Call
The Professional Enterprise Sales Process
More Large Deals in Less Time

A Series of 10 Articles
for Sales and Service Essentials
by Peter Meyer, of the Meyer Group

Do you want to close more enterprise deals, more quickly, at prices that reflect your true value? You're not the first to ask. You've come to the right place.

Here you have the first of a series of 10 articles on how to increase your value to enterprise customers, value as *they* see it. With that you'll move complex deals to quicker closes. This process is based on original research, and has been tested and refined over several years. For complex sales, this is proven to work. Going by the results: When you apply the process and get through the step in Part 8, 95% of the enterprise sales close. And they close within days. This works partially because you are recognized to be delivering more value to your customer.

Each article in the series will take a step of the Enterprise Sales Process and explore it. And since the perception of value starts with the very first time you meet your prospect, the process starts *before* that first call happens. It starts when you choose the right first contact, not the easy one, so let's start there.

The Value Assumption
To cut the time to revenue, you are looking for a sponsor of influence. That should start with a key assumption: That you are here to add value to the customer, not just take his or her money.

That decision to add value to both should drive your plans for whom to call at the customer. The traditional contact may think that she or he should be deciding things, but often you would rather find a business person of real influence at the enterprise.

The recognition of your value as a contributor to your customer is not a function of how high you call. *Your value to the enterprise is a function of what you deliver that a key influencer recognizes as important.* It is not a function of the organization chart. The right person to call on is the one who can help you deliver value and exert influence to make your deal work. She or he will do that when it helps their agenda. Lets look at that a bit more.

Influence is Not Authority
Consider the difference between influence and authority. If you were to want to sell an idea to the U.S. government in Washington, would you look for authority or influence? Is there anyone higher in authority than the President of the United States? However, consider: The President is the commander of the most powerful army in the world, but can he or she get a budget passed?

In workshops we ask executives to identify the most influential people in Washington. The President never gets selected for this. Nor do the Speaker of the House or the leaders of the Senate. We know that the most influential people in the nation's capital don't always have the mantle of authority.

The same applies to your customers. If you would not count on President Obama to make your deal, why would you count on the CEO to make it? You wouldn't. You would go look for influence. In your sales cycle, you cannot have enough influence.

Who do you want? You want to find the right sponsor in the enterprise, and she or he should be a person with real influence who is willing to work to solve his or her own problem.

Looking for the Sponsors of Influence
Finding influence isn't easy. But with a few key indicators you can begin to identify who the most influential people will be.

First: Start with resources. Influencers are given access to time, people, and money to make things happen. Ask around and find who gets the resources inside the enterprise. Key assets flow silently from the least influential to the most influential managers and people. Follow them.

Second: Every organization has a few "go to" persons. These are the women and men that the enterprise relies on when the pressure is at the worst. If you watch top level sport you know who "go to" players are for a winning team. In your enterprise customer, ask who they might be.

Third: Many organizations have a successful manager or executive who is good at promoting the people around her or him. It makes for a very influential person. Ask around for this skill.

Finally: The most influential people are the ones who are known to be great listeners. Consider: When someone listens to you, do you tend to listen to him or her? If you can find the person who is known to listen you will probably find a key influencer.

By the way, when you become the person who listens *you* become a key influencer.

Pause before you pick up the phone and call the person with the most likely title. Make your point of entry into the enterprise the first step in searching for and finding a person with influence. Start here.

To Find the Key Influencers - Look For Who:
1 - Has the most people, the most time, the most money?
2 - Is the "go to" person?
3 - Is known to promote others?
4 - Is known to be a great listener?


Next: Where is your value going to get the most recognition?


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Step 2 - To Get Your Full Value, First Change Your Agenda
You've figured out who to talk to (Start Before Your First Call in Sales and Service Excellence, XX/YY/ZZ, Page A.) Step 2 is your chance to make yourself different, to say the right thing to make that person of influence want to work with you for her or his own agenda. How should you start?

First, you've worked for years to get where you are and build what you have to offer. You believe passionately in yourself and your product. It is only natural that you want to talk about it from the beginning.

That is natural but it is wrong. Our attorney has a phrase for this: The "Enough about you, lets get back to me" habit.

To do better, think as a customer. The last time someone was selling to you, did the seller lead with your agenda or theirs? As a buyer, what do you prefer to discuss? When you buy something important do you decide based on the seller's agenda or on your own agenda?

We train people to start with the seller's agenda. To make sales happen faster instead of starting with you, start with value to them. As a customer, wouldn't you respect a salesperson who asked you what was important before the pitch starts? Now, as a salesperson, wouldn't you want that same respect?

How Do YOU Buy? A True Story
I learned this when I put together a $750,000 deal for automation at a media company. I'd worked with the Jim (the key V.P. and influencer) for months. When I sat down to present the detailed proposal, it was an informal and friendly meeting. Almost immediately he smiled, held up his hand to stop me and asked where in the 80 pages he could find the price.

What to do? It may be tempting to make the customer wait until we're ready. As a customer, doesn't that feel discourteous? Jim had become a key influencer in this company by giving and earning respecting. I knew that I should do that as well. I put aside my presentation and asked: "Why?"

Jim grinned and told me that he had a guess and wanted to see how close it was. I asked him to write that down. Jim asked each person in the room to do the same. Then I told them the page to look at. He and most of his staff had guessed just a little high. That was when I knew that I had the sale. I'd listened to him and then changed my agenda to match his. That gave him comfort that he would get heard when it mattered. It earned me the deal.

How Do YOU Sell? Do You Want A New Story?
Now, take an honest look at how you start your calls. When you walk in to meet an important person in the account for the first time, do you start with:
"Enough about you, lets get back to me"
or
"Enough about me, lets get back to you?"

If you want to be able to move a complex sale to quick closure, start with their agenda before yours. Sounds obvious but lets contrast a typical first call with one that helps you avoid discounting.

In a typical first call you might say:
"Hi Ms. Jones, my name is Peter Meyer. I represent the Meyer Group and we are the world's top new market consultants. We get twice the success of the next guy. We are great! Let me tell you some more."

This works. This gets you the image of being like most other salespeople. You are doing the expected. Now, does it say that you listen well?

In a marketplace filled with typical sales people, don't you want stand out and earn the opportunity to move forward? A call that helps you keep price higher will start more like:
"Hi Ms. Jones. Peter Meyer of the Meyer Group. If you want to reach customers in a way that makes them want to hear more about you, can we start there? What is the most important message that you want to send? With that, lets look at the best way to get it to your audience."

If you find out what is important to your prospect before you present, she or he will see you as fundamentally different from every other salesperson who calls on them. When you start with a conversation, your prospect will see you as a listener. He or she will see you as concerned about your customer. If you project this sincerely, you are on your way to keeping your price at the same level as your value - high. And to speeding a complex enterprise sale for you and your company.
Next: Stop Feature, Function, Benefit selling.


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Step 3 - Improve Past Feature/Function/Benefit Selling
The traditional model for selling is Feature, Function, Benefit. We drum it into our salespeople, and our salespeople go out and present that way to our customers. And we close, in a good year, perhaps 25% of the opportunity and it is usually past the initial forecast date. How can we do better in enterprise selling?

As before (see Sales and Service Excellence XX/YY/ZZ Page A) it works best when you start your thinking in the right place. That is with the customer perspective. Consider, when you invest your own time or money, do you buy the benefit first or the feature first? Most buyers want a benefit. They sit through the rest of the process to get to that benefit. Maybe. If they are good influencers, they probably don't wait. May I give you an example?

Too Often Your Feature is Not Their Benefit
Recently I sat with the senior marketing team from a high tech leader in Silicon Valley. They told me their benefit was Time to Market. I asked who the customers are. The answer: CEOs of telecommunications equipment manufacturers.

I asked how the team knew that these CEOs value Time to Market. The answer was that it must be so. Certainly the analysts agree. There are many articles in the business press about it. It resonates with the marketing teams of almost every competitor.

Does that make it right? No, it makes the idea popular in average. But how many customers are average?

Consider your own priorities. You have a dozens or more urgencies on your list. If the first salesperson offers to solve problems 10 to 12 for you, that's good. If another representative offers to solve one of your top three, which of these two gets your attention?

Most of us will choose to solve a top problem. We'll delegate the lower priorities or just let them go. Successful enterprise selling is all about solving the right problem for the key influencers in the company.

How do you know what is key to one person? There is only one way. Earn the right and ask them.

Solving the Right Problem,
Not Your Favorite Problem

In that meeting I turned to the marketing team and told them that on a project for a different client, our firm had called and asked these same CEOs: "What two things keep you up at night?" It is important, but time to market was *not* in the top three answers. To see what made the top of the list, check the footnote below, but the real point is that you only find out when you ask instead of assume what they think will be successful. Enterprise selling works best when we go in asking: "What keeps you up at night?" And then making that the benefit we sell.

If you go to your prospects with Feature, Function, Benefit, you are starting with your priority without knowing if it matters to their business success. You are reducing your chances of a high margin sale. But what if you do the reverse? What if you go to your prospect the way that she or he prefers to buy?

A good alternative? Ask, then sell Benefit, Function, Feature instead. Start by listening, not telling. Then tailor her or his benefit *before* you start. This applies to every key influencer that you meet, no matter what their title.

When you learn what is top of their list of priorities, then you can sell the benefit they really care about. Only then is it appropriate to tell them how you will deliver it, if they even care. So the process becomes these four steps:
1 - Ask something like: What keeps you up at night?
2 - Discuss the benefit as they see it
3 - Quickly, if necessary, show the function you provide that delivers that benefit
4 - Mention the feature name or description to reinforce this. Then go back to the benefit.

How do you know where to start? Ask. And when they tell you, you are on your way to earning a quick, high margin enterprise sale.

Next Month - When and How to Present You, Using a Unique Selling Proposition

If you want a copy of the article "What Keeps Your CEO Up at Night?" please send an E-mail specifically asking for that article to Peter@MeyerGrp.com. The article is made available courtesy of the Business & Economic Review.


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Step 4 - Using a U.S.P. to
Differentiate You

As you plan your enterprise sale, you've figured out who to talk to (see Sales and Service Excellence XX/YY/ZZ Page A.) You know that you want to focus on the benefit at the individual customer sees it. How do you get the conversation started? As always, it starts with taking the customer's viewpoint and working from there.

Talking about ourselves is easy and fun. However, it is often uninteresting to others. Have you ever been subjected to the
"Enough about you, lets get back to me syndrome?"
by a salesperson? Did it make you want to jump up and buy?

Plan to Be the Person Who Usually
Gets the Next Meeting

The key to adding more value (and margin) to an enterprise sale is to earn the position of the person whom your contact wants to see. She or he will get hundreds of meeting requests. Who gets selected? The people who can help this influencer add value to the business. You can start being that person in the first serious conversation. You can use a Unique Selling Proposition (U.S.P.) to do this.

U.S.P.s are short (between three words and two sentences) statements that highlight the benefit of working with you. Following the Benefit first model (Sales and Service Excellence XX/YY/ZZ, Page A) good USPs lead with the focus on your customer. A good U.S.P. does not talk about you. It talks about your customer.

*The best U.S.P.s earn you the right to continue with your customer. They set the stage to ask for and get the next meetings.*

Want some examples? Look at the business advertisements in this morning's Wall Street Journal. Most of them talk about the vendor. A few, however, reach straight out to the reader. The same is true with slogans. Consider two that worked:
"When you need it absolutely, positively, overnight."
"30 minutes or it's free."

These two U.S.P.s do several things correctly. At the time they appeared, they clearly differentiated the supplier from the postal service and parcel companies. More important, they talk about the user's needs, not the vendor's features. Both focus on solving a problem for "you" instead of talking about how Federal Express or Domino's Pizza gets it done.

After all, are you buying a pizza company or a hot pizza? Is the value to you the delivery method or a package delivered on time? These USPs lead with the benefit, not features. You can craft the same kind of U.S.P. and do it for each key influencer in the enterprise. It starts with assuming that you will ask your contact to share what is important to her or him.

Starting Your U.S.P.
To create a U.S.P. that really works, start with the problem. Then provide the solution. One way to start is to say, "You know how . . ." Then describe the problem in a few words. This is your problem statement.

Now resolve it with, "Well, we help you to . . . ," and describe what your prospect gets. Not what he or she does, or what you do. *Describe what value he or she will get from your service.*

For example: "You know how hard it is to get a hot pizza delivered? Well we'll get it to you hot in 30 minutes or it is free."
Or
"You know how hard it is to get a consistently great return on your money? Well you can get access to tools to help you get the best possible return for your exact situation."

Notice that the two U.S.P.s do not explain the how. They only explain the what. Only when you get a buy-in to that do you earn the right to move on to the how. Your key influencers in the enterprise are under pressure. Help them out, lead with the benefit and save the feature and function for a more relaxed time. Start with understanding the problem, not the solution.

You are much more likely to get paid well to solve a problem if your customer thinks you really do understand it. Invest your time in understanding the enterprise problem as that influencer sees it. Then they will want to become the sponsor for whom you are looking.

Next: Using Success Criteria to Speed Enterprise Sales

(For more on U.S.P.s, take a look at Successfully Sell Your Services Over the Internet from Potentials in Marketing,


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Step 5 - Success Criteria - Ask
So That You Can Sell

Would it help you to know what your prospect would prioritize to make happen the most quickly with the least concern about price? This is about using Success Criteria to speed the deal and increase the revenues and margin.

That happens when you know exactly and in detail how your sponsor defines success for this project. There is a one best way to find what your prospect values highest: Ask, don't assume. Here are two steps to do that.

Success Criteria in Two Steps
Step one is to find out what the key issues are. It could be as simple as following your U.S.P. (see Sales and Service Excellence XX/YY/ZZ, Page A) with: "Does that problem keep you awake at night? If not, what does?"

Don't assume that you know. Consider: Even if you are right, if you assume your key influencer may think you arrogant. That is not what you want. Just as bad, you are likely to be wrong. For instance, most CEOs do not prioritize cost savings. (For the survey results to that question, see below.) But even if you are right, ask and listen. Listening is what earns you the right to go to the next step.

Step two is to ask how your contact will measure success for the resolution of that problem.

Why do you care about how they measure success?
1 - Again, put yourself in your enterprise sponsor's position. Would you prefer to deal with a salesperson who cares about their commission or a businessperson who cares to understand your business needs? You can use success criteria to position you to be that businessperson.
2 - If you know how the enterprise measures success, you can see how much value you will help the sponsor build. This increases the chances of you getting full price and margin.
3 - If your customer is focused on his or her most important problems, your price becomes less important. They may bicker over price when you discuss a problem that matters less, but for the top three priorities the enterprise will want to get to solution as soon as possible.
4 - With Success Criteria, you will know what would be extra but un-needed work or product. Dropping off extra material or service cuts the prices, speeds the path to success for them and improves the margins for you.
5 - You can use this later to get more business at a higher profit from the same customer.

How Do You Ask?
The words to ask about success criteria are quite easy. You can ask questions like:
- How will you know when you are done with this project?
- How will you know when to celebrate?
Or my favorite:
- What defines success for this project?

The answer might be as simple as "Beating the XX market's return each quarter" or as complicated as a contingent technical or regulatory specification. However, a good answer will always be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and most of all: Important.

When you ask the question you might experience a period of quiet. This is good, don't rush it. Let the silence continue until your sponsor understands the answer. If your influencer has not yet thought this through, he or she needs to do that. If you give space, you are helping them to run their own business.

Once you have the sponsor's criteria, make sure you understand them by repeating it in clear words.

Pause, Become Invaluable
At this point it may be tempting to ask - "If I can do that, what's it worth to you?" Don't. Instead, ask: "To who else would this be important? Who else is important for making this success happen for you?"

These are likely to be the key stakeholders. Without them, the project and your sale are much less likely. Get this list from your sponsor. Then ask: "Do they have the same definition of success? Can we ask them?" Usually, your sponsor does not know, but a smart internal contact will agree to find out.

What you have now is invaluable. You have the list of key stakeholders in the decision. You have an idea of how your sponsor measures success. You probably have the right and support to ask the other stakeholders what keeps them up at night. You can go to them to get their success criteria for the project.

Your role has changed, and you're no longer just a vendor. You are key to the success of the enterprise, the person who asks the right questions. By asking the right questions you've earned the right to become part of the enterprise planning process. You want to be this person.

Now, increase your value to the stakeholders and to your sponsor by volunteering to do a survey. We'll explain what that means in the XX/YY/ZZ edition of Sales and Service Excellence.

Meanwhile, take a look at the article What Keeps the Company President Up at Night? from the Business & Economic Review.


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Step 6 - Become THE Expert on What Matters

Knowing your product or service is important but incomplete. To get the enterprise deal to happen quickly, you will want to become an expert on how the customer's Success Criteria. And then on how to use your offering to make those criteria happen.

Think about yourself as a business customer. Do you prefer to buy from people who understand your needs? *When your prospect believes you understand them and their needs, you can ask them work with you to sculpt your offering to meet both of your needs. This article shows how to make that happen.*

Following the process from the last 5 editions of Sales and Service Excellence you now have invaluable information:
- The list of key stakeholders in your customer's decision.
- An idea of how the key sponsor measures success for a problem that keeps him or her up at night.
- The right and support to ask the other stakeholders what keeps them up at night. You can go to them to get their success criteria for the purchase.

You are no longer just a vendor. You are a person who asks the right questions. You can increase your value to the stakeholders and to your sponsor by doing a short in person survey.

A Personal Survey Makes You More Valuable
The survey is very simple. You do the same thing you did in the pervious article but now talk to each stakeholder. Ask each if the sponsor's request is a top priority. If it is, ask how they define success for that.

What will you have when you are done?
- You'll have information that no-one else in the company has,
- You will know what each stakeholder defines as success for the project, and
- What each will need to fully buy in to the implementation.

This works for you because you're working on a problem that ranks as one of the most important that the sponsor perceives. If this problem is one of the most important ones that these managers face, they will care. When you have talked to each of them and then ask them to come sit down and hear what the other stakeholders' answers are, they will make time for that.

Your image will change. You have made yourself a person with a real understanding of the critical issue and a fresh perspective of it.

When you are done with the survey, you will have the success criteria as seen by each of the people you need to have support you. You will have a lot of notes, and an idea of how to adapt your solution so that it has the best chance of success. And you will be able to schedule a meeting to share all that with the stakeholders (see the next month's article in Sales and Service Excellence.)

Survey Steps
The steps are easy.
A - Ask your sponsor to have someone set up a meeting with each stakeholder individually. Let them know that you only need 45 to 60 minutes, and that you will ask two questions.
B - When you get to the meeting, remind the stakeholder that each question and answer is confidential. Later you will share all the answers with the stakeholder as a way of paying them back for the time, but no one's name will be attached to any answer.
C - Then ask: What are your success criteria for this problem? And: Is this problem truly important?
D - Then take lots of notes.
E - When you are done, restate what you have heard and ask if you have it right.

In almost every case you will find that you have a half hour of listening from just those two questions. You may ask some probing questions or you may find that you need to do nothing but keep up. Remember to say thank you and tell them they will be invited to the discussion of the results. They'll come.

Two things to avoid. - Never offer to tell them the answers. Why? Even if you think you know the solution you are probably wrong. You need to hear all the stakeholders before you know anything. Even if you're right, it is insulting to offer a solution before you have heard all the stakeholders.
- Never break confidentiality.

Then schedule the next meeting, where you will share all of this with the stakeholders and then let them buy into the right solution. That is called the Design Session, and we'll discuss it in the next issue of Sales and Service Excellence.


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Step 7 - Helping the Customer to Choose You - Design Session Part 1

An enterprise customer who moves quickly buys from you for his or her own reasons. You can help them do that. A key to your success is the Design Session.

This session is the meeting where you will share the results of your survey (Sales and Service Excellence XX/YY/ZZ Page A) and let the stakeholders define and own the best possible solution. When you are done with the Design Session, you will all have:
- A solution to one of the truly important problems the enterprise faces,
- A solution that has you right in the middle of it, as a member of their team,
- A price you suggest and they have agreed to in this session,
- All the information that you need to create the proposal and contract,
- The commitment of each stakeholder that they will support that proposal and make it happen. They'll do it for their own reasons.

With this, the enterprise team feels ownership and commitment to solve a key problem. They'll treat your offering as part of the solution, on par with each of their efforts.

History shows that 95% of the time you will get this project at a price that is fair to both of you, usually within a week or two.

Ownership - Key to Success

One of the keys to getting a solution that works is that you want the sponsor and stakeholders to chose the solution, not you. You want *them* to have real ownership of it. That is the only way it will get done.

To get ownership, you also need to accept that this team may choose what seems a technically sub-optimal solution. Accept it. Would you rather have an elegant solution or one that will get implemented?

The Design Session Overview

Before you start the session, ask your sponsor or his/her assistant to schedule 4 hours. In advance, make a list of all the likely customer costs for the project, not just yours.

Plan on these steps for your Design Session:

A - Start the session by reviewing the survey answers. Show the stakeholders where they agreed and where they disagreed.
B - Facilitate agreement on one or two success criteria that make sense to them. Don't tell them! This may take a half hour or hour. It usually starts with “Omigod - who said that?” and quickly turns to commonality and compromise. You are very valuable here. This kind of agreement usually takes months or years without a neutral facilitator.
C - Then offer a solution. Use a whiteboard and sketch out a summary for them, diagrams and all. *Be careful not to offer the right solution!* Offer one that is close but a little off. It will not be hard to be a little wrong. You will discover that you didn't know something important.
D - Tell the stakeholders that your idea is wrong, that this is the start of the discussion. Ask them to improve on your idea. If the problem is important, and your solution meets most of the success criteria, they will use the sense of compromise and do that.
E - Again, facilitate an answer.

As the answer unfolds, you'll have a whiteboard full of success criteria and solutions. They will be developing the solutions, and they will be feeling ownership. And since this is important to all of them, they will work to make a quick solution possible.

Why Price is Not Important

Now comes the part where you get to keep your price up and ride their momentum to a quicker deal. Before you stop this discussion, get them to uncover every possible cost. This should include travel, phone charges, stamps, everything. Ask them to be thorough. Make especially sure they look at the costs of people and time.
The total costs for the overall project will probably be much higher than they thought. Perhaps they assumed $2M and the whiteboard shows that it is really $4M. That figure includes your fees, which is a small part of the overall cost. In a total budget of $4M, these stakeholders are not going to start looking at whether your costs should be $1.225M or $1.355M. What they will be doing is asking if the solution is worth four million dollars.

F - So ask the difficult question. Ask what the cost of not doing the solution is. Get each stakeholder to answer. If this is a really important problem, then the cost of doing nothing will be higher than the cost on the board. They will make a quick business decision. They will be committed to making this work, quickly, and your cost will be a minor issue.
G - Go around the room and ask each stakeholder if they will do what it takes to make this work. Ask them to commit in front of their peers. If they do, you will have a deal. If they do not, go back to step D.
H - Say thanks and that you will have a summary of all this on their computers in two hours.

You will have the enterprise committed to move forward, quickly. Don't wait to close.


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The Meyer Group
883 Cadillac Drive
Scotts Valley, CA 95066-3303
(831) 439-9607

Steps 1-7

1- Start Before Your First Call

2- To Get Your Full Value, First Change Your Agenda

3- Improve Past Feature/Function/Benefit Selling

4- Using a U.S.P. to Differentiate You

5- Success Criteria - Ask So That You Can Sell

6- Become THE Expert on What Matters

7- Helping the Customer to Choose You - Design Session Part 1



email: info@meyergrp.com
phone: (831) 439-9607

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